CAST & CREW
Cast
Crew
Clint Eastwood
(Gus)
CLINT EASTWOOD (Gus/Producer) has been honored for his work as a director, producer and actor, including four Oscars® for his work as a director and producer on "Million Dollar Baby" and "Unforgiven."

Eastwood recently directed and produced the biographical drama "J. Edgar," starring Leonardo DiCaprio in the title role. In 2010, He directed the drama "Hereafter," which was nominated for an Oscar® for Best Achievement in Visual Effects, and received Italy's David di Donatello Award for Best Foreign Film.

The year before, Eastwood directed and produced the historical drama "Invictus," starring Morgan Freeman and Matt Damon, who both received Oscar® nominations for their performances. Eastwood also won a National Board of Review Award and earned Golden Globe and Critics' Choice Award nominations for Best Director. Also in 2009, he starred in directed and produced the widely acclaimed drama "Gran Torino." Eastwood won a Best Actor Award from the National Board of Review for his performance as Walt Kowalski, marking his first film role since "Million Dollar Baby."

He previously directed and produced "Changeling," starring Angelina Jolie in the true-life drama about an infamous 1928 kidnapping case. The film was nominated for a Palme d'Or and won a Special Award when it premiered at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival. It also received three Oscar® nominations, including Best Actress for Jolie, and Eastwood garnered BAFTA Award and London Film Critics Award nominations for Best Director, as well as a Golden Globe nomination for the Best Original Score.

Eastwood earned dual Academy Award® nominations, in the categories of Best Director and Best Picture, for his acclaimed 2006 World War II drama "Letters from Iwo Jima." In addition, the film won the Golden Globe and Critics Choice Awards for Best Foreign Language Film, and also received Best Picture awards from a number of film critics groups, including the Los Angeles Film Critics and the National Board of Review. "Letters from Iwo Jima" was the companion film to Eastwood's widely praised drama "Flags of Our Fathers," about the American men who raised the flag on Iwo Jima in the famed photograph.

In 2005, Eastwood won Academy Awards® for Best Picture and Best Director for "Million Dollar Baby," also earning a Best Actor nomination for his performance in the film. In addition, Hilary Swank and Morgan Freeman won Oscars®, for Best Actress and Best Supporting Actor, respectively, and the film was also nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Editing. Eastwood also won his third Best Director Golden Globe, as well as a nomination for the film's score.

Eastwood's critically acclaimed drama "Mystic River" debuted at the 2003 Cannes Film Festival, earning him a Palme d'Or nomination and the Golden Coach Award. "Mystic River" went on to earn six Academy Award® nominations, including two for Eastwood for Best Picture and Best Director. Sean Penn and Tim Robbins won Oscars® in the categories of Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor, while the film was also nominated for Best Supporting Actress and Best Screenplay. Eastwood also gained another Golden Globe nomination.

A decade earlier, Eastwood won his first Oscars® for his foreboding, revisionist Western "Unforgiven," which received a total of nine Academy Award® nominations. Eastwood took home Oscars® for Best Picture and Best Director and was nominated for Best Actor. The film also won in the categories of Best Supporting Actor (Gene Hackman) and Best Editor. Additionally, Eastwood won a Golden Globe for Best Director and the film won Best Picture honors from several critics groups.

Eastwood's films have also been honored internationally by critics and at film festivals, including Cannes, where he served as the president of the jury in 1994. He has garnered Palme d'Or nominations for "White Hunter Black Heart" in 1990; "Bird," which also won the award for Best Actor and an award for its soundtrack at the 1988 festival; and "Pale Rider" in 1985. He also won his first Best Director Golden Globe Award for "Bird."

In addition, Eastwood has directed and starred in such films as "Blood Work," "Space Cowboys," "True Crime," "Absolute Power," "The Bridges of Madison County," "The Rookie," "Heartbreak Ridge," "Sudden Impact," "Honkytonk Man," "Firefox," "Bronco Billy," "The Outlaw Josey Wales," "The Eiger Sanction," "High Plains Drifter," and "Play Misty for Me," which marked his directorial debut.

Eastwood first came to fame as an actor, first on television and then in such legendary movie Westerns as "A Fistful of Dollars," "For a Few Dollars More," "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," "Hang 'Em High," and "Two Mules for Sister Sara." His film acting work also includes "Kelly's Heroes"; "Escape from Alcatraz"; the successful "Dirty Harry" actioners; the comedies "Every Which Way But Loose" and "Any Which Way You Can"; and the thriller "In the Line of Fire."

Over the course of his career, Eastwood has received many lifetime achievement honors, including the Motion Picture Academy's Irving Thalberg Memorial Award and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association's Cecil B. DeMille Award. He has also garnered tributes from the Directors Guild of America, the Producers Guild of America, the Screen Actors Guild, the American Film Institute, the Film Society of Lincoln Center, the French Film Society, the National Board of Review, the Henry Mancini Institute (Hank Award for distinguished service to American music), the Hamburg Film Festival (Douglas Sirk Award), and the Venice Film Festival (Career Golden Lion).

He is also the recipient of a Kennedy Center Honor; awards from the American Cinema Editors and the Publicists Guild; an honorary doctorate in Fine Arts from Wesleyan University; and five People's Choice Awards for Favorite Motion Picture Actor. In 1991, Eastwood was Harvard's Hasty Pudding Theatrical Society's Man of the Year and, in 1992, he received the California Governor's Award for the Arts. He recently received two more significant honors for his contributions to film: the Prix Lumiere at the inaugural Grand Lyon Film Festival; and the Commandeur de la Legion d'honneur, presented by French President Nicolas Sarkozy.


AMY ADAMS (Mickey) is a three-time Academy Award® nominee, whose impressive body of work ranges from major studio hits to acclaimed independent features.

Following "Trouble with the Curve," she stars this fall in Paul Thomas Anderson's 1950s-set drama "The Master." Adams also stars as Lois Lane in Zack Snyder's much-anticipated action adventure "Man of Steel," which brings Superman back to the big screen in June 2013. Among her other upcoming films, she stars in an as-yet-untitled near-future film for director Spike Jonze; the comedy-drama "Lullaby"; and a political drama to be directed by David O. Russell. In addition, she is set to produce and star in "Object of Beauty," based on the book by Steve Martin.

On the stage, Adams starred this summer in "Into the Woods," a presentation of Shakespeare in the Park, at the Delacorte Theater.

Adams earned her first Oscar® nomination for her performance in the 2005 indie film "Junebug." In addition, she garnered a Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Award® nomination and won an Independent Spirit Award, as well as a number of critics group awards for her work in that film.

She received her second Academy Award® nomination for her role in John Patrick Shanley's 2008 thought-provoking drama "Doubt," in which she starred with Meryl Streep and Philip Seymour Hoffman. Adams' performance in the film as the conflicted Sister James also brought her Golden Globe, BAFTA Award and SAG Award® nominations.

Last year, Adams was honored with her most recent Oscar® nod for her work in David O. Russell's true-life drama "The Fighter," in which she starred with Mark Wahlberg and Christian Bale. For her portrayal of the tougher-than-she-looks bartender, Charlene, she was also recognized with Golden Globe, BAFTA Award, and Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Award® nominations.

Her recent film credits also include the family hit "The Muppets"; the romantic comedy "Leap Year"; the comedy "Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian," with Ben Stiller; and Nora Ephron's "Julie & Julia," playing real-life blogger Julie Powell, with Meryl Streep portraying legendary chef Julia Child.

In 2007, she delighted moviegoers in Kevin Lima's musical hit "Enchanted," earning a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical for her performance as the displaced, would-be fairy tale princess, Giselle. Adams had first caught the attention of critics and audiences when she co- starred with Leonardo DiCaprio in Steven Spielberg's fact-based drama "Catch Me If You Can."

Her additional film credits include "Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day"; "Sunshine Cleaning," opposite Emily Blunt; Mike Nichols' "Charlie Wilson's War," with Tom Hanks and Julia Roberts; and Adam McKay's "Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby," with Will Ferrell.
JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE (Johnny) is a Grammy and Emmy Award-winning entertainer whose talents have garnered him critical acclaim in music, television and film.

His 2010 performance as the enigmatic entrepreneur Sean Parker in David Fincher's Oscar®-nominated box office hit "The Social Network" was praised by critics and audiences. On the small screen, he won an Emmy for Outstanding Guest Actor on "Saturday Night Live" (SNL) in 2009 and again in 2011, appearing in many memorable sketches that became viral video sensations, including "D**k in a Box," viewed over 100 million times on YouTube. His recurring work on SNL also garnered Emmy Awards for his music, including one in 2007 and another in 2011 for Original Outstanding Music and Lyrics.

Timberlake will next be seen with Carey Mulligan and Oscar Isaac in Joel and Ethan Coen's "Inside Llewyn Davis," slated for release next year. He is currently shooting Brad Furman's thriller "Runner, Runner," alongside Ben Affleck and Gemma Arterton.

His previous feature credits include the comedies "Friends with Benefits," starring Mila Kunis, and "Bad Teacher," with Cameron Diaz and Jason Segel; Andrew Niccol's sci-fi thriller "In Time," opposite Amanda Seyfried; Nick Cassavetes' crime drama "Alpha Dog," starring Emile Hirsch, Sharon Stone and Bruce Willis; Craig Brewer's "Black Snake Moan," with Christina Ricci and Samuel L. Jackson; Richard Kelly's "Southland Tales," starring Sarah Michelle Geller and Dwayne Johnson; and the independent film "The Open Road," alongside Jeff Bridges, Mary Steenburgen, Harry Dean Stanton and Kate Mara. Timberlake also lent his voice to the lead roles in the box office hits "Yogi Bear" and "Shrek the Third."

His other television performances include hosting MTV's Europe Music Awards, Nickelodeon's Kid's Choice Awards, and ESPN's ESPY Awards, as well as co-hosting MTV's Movie Awards.

Timberlake first rose to fame as a member of the phenomenally successful pop group 'N Sync. He then launched a solo career, selling nearly 17 million albums worldwide with his two multi-platinum certified solo albums that also earned him six Grammy Awards. In addition to successful tours, he headlined the HBO special "Justin Timberlake: FutureSex/LoveShow."

Among Timberlake's other honors are the 2011 Environmental Media Futures Award and, in 2010, Harvard University's coveted Hasty Pudding Man of the Year.
JOHN GOODMAN (Pete Klein) is one of the entertainment industry's most respected actors. He earned a Golden Globe nomination in 1992 for his chilling performance in the Coen brothers' heralded "Barton Fink," after delivering a breakthrough motion picture performance in the Coen brothers' earlier "Raising Arizona." He has since teamed with them in "The Big Lebowski," "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" and the upcoming "Inside Llewyn Davis," which opens in theaters in December. In the fall Goodman will also be seen in Ben Affleck's dramatic thriller "Argo," opening October 12, as well as Robert Zemeckis' drama "Flight" in November. He also once again lends his voice as Sully to "Monster University," out next summer.

Goodman was most recently seen in Stephen Daldry's Oscar® nominated "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close," and shared Broadcast Film Critics Association Critics Choice Award and Screen Actors Guild Award® nominations for best ensemble with the cast of writer/director Michel Hazanavicius' homage to Hollywood's silent film era, "The Artist."

On television, he can be seen in the critically acclaimed series "Damages" and "Treme," and recently appeared alongside Al Pacino in the award-winning Jack Kevorkian biopic "You Don't Know Jack," earning an Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie. He previously won the Emmy for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series for his turn in Aaron Sorkin's "Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip."

In addition to his work in front of the camera, he has lent his voice to numerous animated characters, with voiceover credits including "Monsters, Inc.," "Cars," "The Emperor's New Groove" and its small screen continuation, "The Emperor's New School," "Tales of the Rat Fink," "The Jungle Book 2," "Bee Movie," "The Princess and the Frog" and, most recently, "ParaNorman." He also voiced one of the main characters in NBC's animated primetime series "Father of the Pride."

Goodman's many additional film credits include Kevin Smith's indie political horror/thriller "Red State," "Evan Almighty," "Death Sentence," "Drunk Boat," "Confessions of a Shopaholic," "In the Electric Mist," "Gigantic," "Speed Racer," "Marilyn Hotchkiss' Ballroom Dancing and Charm School," "Beyond the Sea," "Masked and Anonymous," "Storytelling," "One Night at McCool's," "Coyote Ugly," "What Planet Are You From?," "Bringing Out the Dead," "The Runner," "Blues Brothers 2000," "Fallen," "The Borrowers," "Mother Night," "Pie in the Sky," "The Flintstones," "Born Yesterday," "Matinee," "The Babe," "King Ralph," "Arachnophobia," "Stella," "Always," "Sea of Love," "Everybody's All-American," "Punchline," "The Wrong Guys," "The Big Easy," "Burglar," "True Stories," "Sweet Dreams," "Maria's Lovers," "C.H.U.D.," "Revenge of the Nerds" and "Eddie Macon's Run."

A St. Louis native, Goodman studied at Southwest Missouri State, graduating in 1975 with a B.F.A. degree in Theatre. His stage credits include regional theatre productions of "Henry IV, Parts I and II," "Antony and Cleopatra" and "As You Like It." He performed in a touring production of "The Robber Bridegroom" and starred in the Broadway productions of "Waiting for Godot" in 2009; "The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui" in 2002; "Big River" in 1985, for which he earned a Drama Desk Award nomination; and "Loose Ends" in 1979. In 2001, he starred with Meryl Streep and Kevin Kline in the Shakespeare in the Park production of "The Seagull."
MATTHEW LILLARD (Phillip Sanderson) most recently appeared alongside George Clooney in the Oscar® and Golden Globe Award-winning feature "The Descendants," co-written and directed by Alexander Payne. Lillard's work in the film helped garner the cast Critics Choice Award and Screen Actors Guild Award nominations as well.

Lillard attended the Academy of Dramatic Arts in Pasadena, California. Upon graduation, he established the Mean Street Ensemble, before moving to New York to continue his education at Circle in the Square. Known to audiences for the infectious energy he brings to the characters he plays in movies, television, and theater, his career took off when he starred in the hit feature "Scream," playing ruthless killer Stuart Macher.

His acclaim grew with his portrayal of the title role in the Sundance favorite "SLC Punk!" Lillard then starred as the beloved Shaggy in the hugely popular "Scooby-Doo" and it's follow up, "Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed." He next showed his range by starring in Kenneth Branagh's musical version of "Shakespeare's "Love's Labour's Lost," in Paul McGuigan's thriller "Wicker Park," in the Ed Burns ensemble feature "The Groomsmen," and in the hit comedy "Without a Paddle."

On the small screen, he did a star turn opposite legend Carol Burnett on NBC's "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," a special guest role on CBS's "Gary Unmarried," and played the lead in the ABC movie "Married Not Dead," opposite Jonathan Silverman.

Lillard starred in and co-produced the festival hit "Spooner," and recently completed his feature directorial debut, "Fat Kid Rules the World," a comedy which he also produced, starring Billy Campbell and Jacob Wysocki, and featuring original music by Mike McCready of Pearl Jam.
ROBERT PATRICK (Vince) was on the big screen earlier this year alongside Denzel Washington in the action thriller "Safe House." He will next be seen in the upcoming films "Gangster Squad," also starring Josh Brolin, Ryan Gosling and Sean Penn, directed by Ruben Fleischer; "Jayne Mansfield's Car," featuring Billy Bob Thornton, who also directs, Robert Duvall and Kevin Bacon; "Lovelace," playing husband to Sharon Stone; and "Identity Thief," with Melissa McCarthy and Jason Bateman. Patrick's other recent film credits include the independent film "Good Day for It" and the actioner "S.W.A.T.: Firefight." This fall he will return to network television on Shawn Ryan's "Last Resort" for ABC.

Patrick has appeared in numerous feature films, including "Flags of Our Fathers," Clint Eastwood's Golden Globe-nominated WWII epic tale of the battle for Iwo Jima; "We Are Marshall," alongside an all-star cast, including Matthew McConaughey; "The Marine"; "Firewall," with Harrison Ford; the Golden Globe- winning "Walk the Line," opposite Joaquin Phoenix as Johnny Cash's father, for director James Mangold; "Men Who Stare at Goats," with George Clooney; and the comedy "Strange Wilderness," about a television nature show that goes in search of Bigfoot to boost ratings.

Adding to his extensive television and film resume, Patrick starred as Colonel Tom Ryan in the CBS action drama "The Unit," produced by David Mamet, about a team of America's covert operatives and how their dangerous jobs affect their lives. Audiences also remember him as John Doggett on the last two seasons of Fox Television's cult-classic "The X-Files." And Patrick received critical acclaim for his high profile performances in the second season of HBO's "The Sopranos."

Patrick is perhaps best known for his performance as the T-1000 in the box office smash hit "Terminator 2: Judgment Day." His other movies include "Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle"; "Spy Kids," opposite Antonio Banderas; "All the Pretty Horses," with Matt Damon, directed by Billy Bob Thornton; "The Faculty"; "From Dusk Till Dawn 2: Texas Blood Money"; "Copland," alongside Sylvester Stallone and Robert De Niro; "Eye See You," also with Stallone; "A Texas Funeral"; the independent film "The Only Thrill," opposite Diane Keaton, Diane Lane and Sam Shepard; a chilling appearance in John Singleton's "Rosewood"; "Striptease," with Demi Moore; "Fire in The Sky"; "Double Dragon: The Movie"; "Decoy"; "The Last Gasp"; "Hong Kong `97"; and, as a heroic firefighter alongside John Travolta and Joaquin Phoenix, "Ladder 49." He was also featured in an episode of Showtime's "The Outer Limits," the TNT Original Movie "Bad Apple," and CBS's miniseries "Elvis," in which he plays Elvis's father.

Patrick spends countless hours giving back to his community. He has been the Honorary Grand Marshall for the Love Ride for the past 15 years, helping to raise millions of dollars in the pursuit of literacy; he has built homes for disabled veteran with Habitat for Humanity; has participated in the Read Across America program by reading to children; and has ridden across the country to participate in Rolling Thunder, which makes sure that the administration does not forget the POWs and MIAs from past wars. Patrick has also been to the Middle East twice, most recently to Iraq and Afghanistan with then-Commander of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Andrew Mullen, to support the troops. He is also a member of the Boozefighters Motorcycle Club, which hosts numerous charitable events.

Born in Marietta, Georgia, Patrick was an avid athlete growing up, but was taken with acting after sitting in on some drama classes in high school. He moved to Hollywood in 1984 and was cast in the beatnik play "Go." He got his break during this performance when he was discovered by legendary producer/director Roger Corman. Ever involved in all aspects of his trade, Patrick enjoys producing when he is not performing.
JOE MASSINGILL (Bo Gentry) holds a BFA in Theater Arts from Valdosta State University and is a proud graduate of the prestigious Upright Citizens Brigade Theater in Hollywood.

Among his television credits is a featured role on FOX's megahit series "Glee." He has also appeared in several feature shorts.

A native of Georgia, Massingill currently resides in Los Angeles.
ROBERT LORENZ (Director/Producer) continues his progression as a filmmaker making his feature directorial debut with "Trouble with the Curve." Already a prolific producer, Lorenz has earned two Academy Award® nominations in the last decade producing films for Clint Eastwood at his Malpaso Productions.

Lorenz received his first Oscar® nomination in 2004 for producing "Mystic River." The following year he served as executive producer on the Best Picture winner "Million Dollar Baby." Lorenz went on to produce Eastwood's World War II companion pieces, "Flags of Our Fathers" and "Letters from Iwo Jima." The latter, which he produced along with Eastwood and Steven Spielberg, brought Lorenz his second Academy Award® nomination. Shot almost entirely in Japanese, "Letters from Iwo Jima" also won the Los Angeles Film Critics and National Board of Review Awards for Best Picture, as well as the Golden Globe and Critics Choice Awards for Best Foreign Language Film.

In 2008, Lorenz worked with Brian Grazer and Ron Howard to produce Eastwood's true-life drama "Changeling," which went on to receive three Academy Award® nominations, including one for Angelina Jolie as Best Actress. The same year, Lorenz and Eastwood produced "Gran Torino," Malpaso's highest grossing film to date.

Lorenz most recently produced Eastwood's "J. Edgar," with Leonardo DiCaprio; "Hereafter," starring Matt Damon; and "Invictus," which earned a Producers Guild of America Award nomination. Starring Damon and Morgan Freeman in Oscar®-nominated performances, the film received Golden Globe Award nominations for Best Picture and Director.

Lorenz grew up in the suburbs of Chicago and moved to Los Angeles to start his film career in 1989. He began his association with Eastwood as an assistant director on "The Bridges of Madison County." Their subsequent collaborations include "Space Cowboys," "True Crime," "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil," "Absolute Power" and "Blood Work."
RANDY BROWN (Screenwriter) grew up in Northern California and is an avid fan of baseball. "Trouble with the Curve" is his first produced feature.

Upon graduating from high school, Brown moved to New York and studied acting with Herbert Berghof at HB Studio, appearing in commercials, soaps, theatre and television, including the series "Matlock." Among Brown's writing credits are episodes for the television series "The Sentinel" and "Twice in a Lifetime."

He currently has both TV and feature projects in development at several studios.

Aside from baseball, Brown's other love is music. The original song "On My Way," which he co-wrote with his band The Neighbors and Greg Camp from Smashmouth, can be heard in the film.
CLINT EASTWOOD (Gus/Producer) has been honored for his work as a director, producer and actor, including four Oscars® for his work as a director and producer on "Million Dollar Baby" and "Unforgiven."

Eastwood recently directed and produced the biographical drama "J. Edgar," starring Leonardo DiCaprio in the title role. In 2010, He directed the drama "Hereafter," which was nominated for an Oscar® for Best Achievement in Visual Effects, and received Italy's David di Donatello Award for Best Foreign Film.

The year before, Eastwood directed and produced the historical drama "Invictus," starring Morgan Freeman and Matt Damon, who both received Oscar® nominations for their performances. Eastwood also won a National Board of Review Award and earned Golden Globe and Critics' Choice Award nominations for Best Director. Also in 2009, he starred in directed and produced the widely acclaimed drama "Gran Torino." Eastwood won a Best Actor Award from the National Board of Review for his performance as Walt Kowalski, marking his first film role since "Million Dollar Baby."

He previously directed and produced "Changeling," starring Angelina Jolie in the true-life drama about an infamous 1928 kidnapping case. The film was nominated for a Palme d'Or and won a Special Award when it premiered at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival. It also received three Oscar® nominations, including Best Actress for Jolie, and Eastwood garnered BAFTA Award and London Film Critics Award nominations for Best Director, as well as a Golden Globe nomination for the Best Original Score.

Eastwood earned dual Academy Award® nominations, in the categories of Best Director and Best Picture, for his acclaimed 2006 World War II drama "Letters from Iwo Jima." In addition, the film won the Golden Globe and Critics Choice Awards for Best Foreign Language Film, and also received Best Picture awards from a number of film critics groups, including the Los Angeles Film Critics and the National Board of Review. "Letters from Iwo Jima" was the companion film to Eastwood's widely praised drama "Flags of Our Fathers," about the American men who raised the flag on Iwo Jima in the famed photograph.

In 2005, Eastwood won Academy Awards® for Best Picture and Best Director for "Million Dollar Baby," also earning a Best Actor nomination for his performance in the film. In addition, Hilary Swank and Morgan Freeman won Oscars®, for Best Actress and Best Supporting Actor, respectively, and the film was also nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Editing. Eastwood also won his third Best Director Golden Globe, as well as a nomination for the film's score.

Eastwood's critically acclaimed drama "Mystic River" debuted at the 2003 Cannes Film Festival, earning him a Palme d'Or nomination and the Golden Coach Award. "Mystic River" went on to earn six Academy Award® nominations, including two for Eastwood for Best Picture and Best Director. Sean Penn and Tim Robbins won Oscars® in the categories of Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor, while the film was also nominated for Best Supporting Actress and Best Screenplay. Eastwood also gained another Golden Globe nomination.

A decade earlier, Eastwood won his first Oscars® for his foreboding, revisionist Western "Unforgiven," which received a total of nine Academy Award® nominations. Eastwood took home Oscars® for Best Picture and Best Director and was nominated for Best Actor. The film also won in the categories of Best Supporting Actor (Gene Hackman) and Best Editor. Additionally, Eastwood won a Golden Globe for Best Director and the film won Best Picture honors from several critics groups.

Eastwood's films have also been honored internationally by critics and at film festivals, including Cannes, where he served as the president of the jury in 1994. He has garnered Palme d'Or nominations for "White Hunter Black Heart" in 1990; "Bird," which also won the award for Best Actor and an award for its soundtrack at the 1988 festival; and "Pale Rider" in 1985. He also won his first Best Director Golden Globe Award for "Bird."

In addition, Eastwood has directed and starred in such films as "Blood Work," "Space Cowboys," "True Crime," "Absolute Power," "The Bridges of Madison County," "The Rookie," "Heartbreak Ridge," "Sudden Impact," "Honkytonk Man," "Firefox," "Bronco Billy," "The Outlaw Josey Wales," "The Eiger Sanction," "High Plains Drifter," and "Play Misty for Me," which marked his directorial debut.

Eastwood first came to fame as an actor, first on television and then in such legendary movie Westerns as "A Fistful of Dollars," "For a Few Dollars More," "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," "Hang 'Em High," and "Two Mules for Sister Sara." His film acting work also includes "Kelly's Heroes"; "Escape from Alcatraz"; the successful "Dirty Harry" actioners; the comedies "Every Which Way But Loose" and "Any Which Way You Can"; and the thriller "In the Line of Fire."

Over the course of his career, Eastwood has received many lifetime achievement honors, including the Motion Picture Academy's Irving Thalberg Memorial Award and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association's Cecil B. DeMille Award. He has also garnered tributes from the Directors Guild of America, the Producers Guild of America, the Screen Actors Guild, the American Film Institute, the Film Society of Lincoln Center, the French Film Society, the National Board of Review, the Henry Mancini Institute (Hank Award for distinguished service to American music), the Hamburg Film Festival (Douglas Sirk Award), and the Venice Film Festival (Career Golden Lion).

He is also the recipient of a Kennedy Center Honor; awards from the American Cinema Editors and the Publicists Guild; an honorary doctorate in Fine Arts from Wesleyan University; and five People's Choice Awards for Favorite Motion Picture Actor. In 1991, Eastwood was Harvard's Hasty Pudding Theatrical Society's Man of the Year and, in 1992, he received the California Governor's Award for the Arts. He recently received two more significant honors for his contributions to film: the Prix Lumiere at the inaugural Grand Lyon Film Festival; and the Commandeur de la Legion d'honneur, presented by French President Nicolas Sarkozy.
MICHELE WEISLER (Producer) has been in the entertainment industry for over 25 years. Some of her executive producer credits include David Ayer's "Street Kings," written by James Ellroy and starring Keanu Reeves and Forest Whitaker; "The Ring," directed by Gore Verbinski and starring Naomi Watts, and "The Ring 2," directed by Hideo Nakata and also starring Watts; "Novocaine," starring Steve Martin, Laura Dern and Helena Bonham-Carter, which opened the 2001 Toronto Film Festival; and "Stir of Echoes," starring Kevin Bacon, marking her second collaboration with director David Koepp. Weisler earlier served as an associate producer on Koepp's directorial debut feature "The Trigger Effect," starring Kyle MacLachlan, Elisabeth Shue and Dermot Mulroney.

Her other feature producing credits include the family film "Paulie," as a co- producer; and "Try Seventeen," directed by Jeff Porter and starring Elijah Wood, Franka Potente and Mandy Moore, which Weisler developed and produced. The film premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Among her television producing credits is the TBS pilot set in Nashville's minor league baseball world, "Hound Dogs," written and directed by Ron Shelton. She currently has a second pilot written by Shelton in development at TNT.

Weisler is actively raising equity to start a film fund that will partner on both independent and studio pictures. She currently owns the rights to more than 20 novels and has numerous additional projects in development, including the adaptation of Dan Fante's novel "Mooch"; "The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle," adapted from Avi's Newbery Award-winning novel by Danny DeVito for him to direct, and set to star Morgan Freeman; the world renowned novel "Things Fall Apart," by Chinua Achebe; and "On Finaghy Road," the story of the two women who won the Nobel Peace Prize for creating the largest peace movement in Ireland's history.

Graduating with a degree in film from the University of Wisconsin, Weisler then began her career as an intern working on Roger Corman's horror movie "The Nest." Rising through the ranks of Corman's Concorde Pictures, she co-produced over 20 feature films, and was responsible for all physical production at the company by the age of 25.
TIM MOORE (Executive Producer) most recently produced, with Graham King, Angelina Jolie and Tim Headington, "In the Land of Blood and Honey," which marked Jolie's directorial debut. The film, which Jolie also wrote, received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Foreign Language film, the Stanley Kramer Award from the Producers Guild and the Best Foreign Film Award at the NAACP Image Awards.

Moore has overseen the physical production of all of Clint Eastwood's films since 2002, including "J. Edgar," starring Leonardo DiCaprio. In 2009, he executive produced the critically acclaimed drama "Invictus," starring Matt Damon and Morgan Freeman, which received widespread acclaim from critics associations and several Oscar® and Golden Globe nominations, including a Golden Globe nod for Best Picture.

In addition, Moore was an executive producer on "Hereafter," "Gran Torino" and "Changeling," and served as co-producer on the dual World War II epics "Flags of Our Fathers" and the award-winning "Letters from Iwo Jima," which was Oscar®- nominated for Best Picture. His work with Eastwood also includes the dramas "Mystic River," which earned six Oscar® nominations, including one for Best Picture, and "Million Dollar Baby," which won four Academy Awards®, including Best Picture. He was also a co-producer on Alison Eastwood's directorial debut, "Rails & Ties."

Moore has also worked several times with director Rowdy Herrington over the last two decades, most recently producing the ESPY-nominated biopic "Bobby Jones: Stroke of Genius." Their earlier collaborations include the films "A Murder of Crows," "Road House" and "Jack's Back."

Moore's other producing credits include Steve Buscemi's "Animal Factory," starring Willem Dafoe, and Arne Glimcher's "The White River Kid." For television, Moore was the production manager on the telefilm "Semper Fi" and produced the telefilm "Stolen from the Heart."

Before starting his film career, Moore attended UCLA, where he met fraternity brother John Shepherd. The two have gone on to produce four independent features together: "Eye of the Storm," "The Ride," "The Climb" and "Bobby Jones: Stroke of Genius."

Moore and his wife, Bobbe, are actively engaged in a number of animal rescue organizations.
TOM STERN (Director of Photography) earned both Oscar® and BAFTA Award nominations for Best Cinematography for his work on Clint Eastwood's drama "Changeling." Stern, who has enjoyed a long association with Eastwood, most recently lensed his critically acclaimed drama "J. Edgar." He also served as the cinematographer on Eastwood's "Hereafter," "Invictus," "Gran Torino," the World War II dramas "Flags of Our Fathers" and "Letters from Iwo Jima," the Oscar®-winning dramas "Million Dollar Baby" and "Mystic River," and "Blood Work," which marked Stern's first film as a director of photography.

Stern's collaborations with other directors include "Sleepless Night," from Frédéric Jardin, and the worldwide blockbuster "The Hunger Games," from Gary Ross. He also shot Pavel Lungin's "Tsar," Susanne Bier's "Things We Lost in the Fire," Christophe Barratier's "Paris 36," Alison Eastwood's "Rails & Ties," Tony Goldwyn's "The Last Kiss," John Turturro's "Romance & Cigarettes," Scott Derrickson's "The Exorcism of Emily Rose" and Rowdy Herrington's "Bobby Jones: Stroke of Genius."

A 40-year industry veteran, Stern has worked with Clint Eastwood for more than three decades, going back to when Stern was a gaffer on such films as "Honkytonk Man," "Sudden Impact," "Tightrope," "Pale Rider" and "Heartbreak Ridge." Becoming the chief lighting technician at Malpaso Productions, he worked on a wide range of films, including Eastwood's "The Rookie," "Unforgiven," "A Perfect World," "True Crime" and "Space Cowboys." As a chief lighting technician, he also teamed with other directors, including Michael Apted on "Class Action," and Sam Mendes on "American Beauty" and "Road to Perdition," among others.
JAMES J. MURAKAMI (Production Designer) was honored in 2008 with Oscar® and BAFTA Award nominations for his work as the production designer on Clint Eastwood's period drama "Changeling," set in 1928. His production designs for "Changeling" and Eastwood's "Gran Torino" were nominated for Art Director's Guild Awards, in the period and contemporary categories, respectively. He most recently worked with the director on the dramas "Hereafter," "Invictus" and "J. Edgar."

Murakami's first film with Eastwood as a production designer was the acclaimed World War II drama "Letters from Iwo Jima." He had previously collaborated with Eastwood's longtime production designer Henry Bumstead, first as a set designer on "Unforgiven" and later as an art director on "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil."

In 2005, Murakami won an Emmy Award for his work as an art director on the acclaimed HBO series "Deadwood." He had earned his first Emmy Award nomination for his art direction on the series Western the year prior.

Murakami was the production designer on Alison Eastwood's directorial debut feature, "Rails & Ties." His many feature film credits as an art director include the Tony Scott films "Enemy of the State," "Crimson Tide," "True Romance" and "Beverly Hills Cop II"; David Fincher's "The Game"; Peter Hyams' "The Relic"; Martin Brest's "Midnight Run" and "Beverly Hills Cop"; Barry Levinson's "The Natural," for which he received an Oscar® nomination as art director; and John Badham's "WarGames." He has also served as a set designer on such films as "The Scorpion King," "The Princess Diaries," "The Postman," "Head Above Water," "I Love Trouble" and "Sneakers."
GARY D. ROACH (Editor) has worked with Clint Eastwood since 1996, beginning as an apprentice editor on "Absolute Power." Roach quickly moved up to assistant editor on the films "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil," "True Crime," "Space Cowboys," "Blood Work," "Mystic River," "Million Dollar Baby" and "Flags of Our Fathers."

The award-winning World War II drama "Letters from Iwo Jima" marked Roach's first full editor credit, shared with longtime Eastwood collaborator Joel Cox. Roach gained his first solo editor credit on Alison Eastwood's directorial debut film, "Rails & Ties." He continued his collaboration with Clint Eastwood and Joel Cox on "Changeling," for which he earned a BAFTA Award nomination for Best Editing. "Gran Torino," "Invictus," "Hereafter" and "J. Edgar" are his latest editing accomplishments.

In addition, Roach was a co-editor on the Eastwood-directed "Piano Blues," a segment of the documentary series "The Blues," produced by Martin Scorsese. Continuing his documentary work, Roach went on to co-edit a film about Tony Bennett called "Tony Bennett: The Music Never Ends," and a documentary on the life of Dave Brubeck called "In His Own Sweet Way."
JOEL COX (Editor) has worked with Clint Eastwood for more than 35 years, and won an Academy Award® for Best Editing for his work on the director's "Unforgiven." He received another Oscar® nomination for his editing work on Eastwood's "Million Dollar Baby," and earned a BAFTA Award nomination for his work on "Changeling." His recent collaborations with Eastwood include "J. Edgar," "Hereafter," "Invictus," "Gran Torino" and the companion World War II dramas "Flags of Our Fathers" and "Letters from Iwo Jima."

In addition, Cox was the editor on the Eastwood-directed films "Mystic River," "Blood Work," "Space Cowboys," "True Crime," "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil," "Absolute Power," "The Bridges of Madison County," "A Perfect World," "The Rookie," "White Hunter Black Heart," "Bird," "Heartbreak Ridge," "Pale Rider" and "Sudden Impact."

Their relationship began in 1975 when Cox worked as an assistant editor on "The Outlaw Josey Wales." Since then, Cox has worked in the editing room on more than 30 films that have, in some combination, been directed or produced by or starred Eastwood.

Early in his career, Cox worked alongside his mentor, editor Ferris Webster, as a co-editor on such films as "The Enforcer," "The Gauntlet," "Every Which Way But Loose," "Escape from Alcatraz," "Bronco Billy" and "Honkytonk Man." His other credits as an editor include "Tightrope," "The Dead Pool," "Pink Cadillac" and "The Stars Fell on Henrietta."
DEBORAH HOPPER (Costume Designer) has worked with filmmaker Clint Eastwood for over 25 years. Recently, Hopper and Eastwood were honored with The Most Distinguished Collaborators Award by the Costume Designer Guild. Hopper previously earned a Costume Designer Guild Award nomination as well as a BAFTA Award nomination for her period costumes for Eastwood's true-life drama "Changeling." In addition, Hopper was named Costume Designer of the Year at the 2008 Hollywood Film Festival.

Hopper most recently designed the costumes for Eastwood's "J. Edgar." She was also the costume designer on the contemporary drama "Gran Torino," which Eastwood starred in and directed, followed by Eastwood's dramas "Invictus" and "Hereafter." Hopper also designed the costumes for the Eastwood-directed films "Letters from Iwo Jima," "Flags of Our Fathers," "Million Dollar Baby," "Mystic River," "Blood Work" and "Space Cowboys."

She began her association with Eastwood as the woman's costume supervisor on the 1984 film "Tightrope," which Eastwood produced and starred in. She held the same post on the films "The Rookie," "Pink Cadillac," "The Dead Pool," "Bird," "Heartbreak Ridge" and "Pale Rider," before overseeing all costumes on Eastwood's "True Crime," "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil" and "Absolute Power."

Earlier in her career, she was awarded an Emmy for her work as a women's costumer on "Shakedown on the Sunset Strip," a telefilm set in the 1950s.
MARCO BELTRAMI (Composer) scored director Kathryn Bigelow's acclaimed "Hurt Locker," which won six Academy Awards®, including Best Picture and Director, as well as garnering Beltrami an Academy Award nomination for Best Score. He also received an Academy Award® nomination for his score to Jim Mangold's "3:10 to Yuma."

Beltrami most recently composed the score for James Watkins' "The Woman in Black," starring Daniel Radcliffe, and the soon-to-be released Sundance Audience Award winner "The Sessions," starring Helen Hunt, John Hawkes and William H. Macy. His music will also be heard in the 2013 releases "A Good Day to Die Hard," the next chapter of the "Die Hard" films; the thriller "Snowpiercer"; and Marc Forster's sci fi actioner "World War Z," starring Brad Pitt.

His many other feature credits include "The Thing"; "Soul Surfer"; Wes Craven's "Scream 4" and "My Soul to Take; "Jonah Hex"; Alex Proya's "Knowing" and "I Robot"; Len Wiseman's "Live Free or Die Hard"; "The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada," for director Tommy Lee Jones; Guillermo del Toro's "Hellboy" and "Don't Be Afraid of the Dark"; and Jonathan Mostow's "Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines."

A protégé of acclaimed composer Jerry Goldsmith, Beltrami got his big break scoring Wes Craven's "Scream." Beltrami threw away conventional horror music clichés, calling upon the influences of his idol, Ennio Morricone, and likening the film to a western.